November is National Diabetes Awareness Month, and as part of ShopRite’s continued commitment to providing vital health and wellness services to its shoppers, the supermarket is offering free glucose and cholesterol screenings at all of its stores. Additionally, select ShopRite locations are offering free store tours led by in-store dietitians that focus on products and foods that assist shoppers managing diabetes or prediabetes.

“We’re excited to be able to offer our customers a one-stop-shopping experience that answers their questions, needs and concerns when it comes to taking care of themselves and loved ones who have been diagnosed with diabetes,” said Stephanie Perez, RD, Retail Dietitian Supervisor at ShopRite.

During the free diabetes store tour, which will be led by each store’s dietitian, participants will learn about label reading, controlling blood sugar through foods, meal planning, and will also have the opportunity to sample products and foods.

In addition, the supermarket is offering free cholesterol and blood glucose screenings throughout the month of November. Walk-in screenings are available at all ShopRite locations, no fasting needed.

“We can check both cholesterol and blood sugar levels with one simple test,” says Natalie Menza-Crowe, RD, MS, Director of Health and Wellness at ShopRite. “Helping people to ‘know their numbers’ is an important first step. With this knowledge, you can be sure you’re on a healthy path — or you can work with your doctor to make adjustments to get you back on track.”

Controlling cholesterol and blood sugar levels are two actions included on the American Heart Association’s “Life’s Simple 7”, which are key measures and behaviors that can help people stay healthy and lower their risk for heart disease, stroke and other major problems. About 40 percent of American adults have total cholesterol of 200 mg/dL or higher, putting them at greater risk for heart disease.

Likewise, according to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, over 30 million Americans have diabetes, and one in four people with diabetes don’t know they have it. About 86 million Americans ages 20 years or older have prediabetes. In prediabetes, blood glucose levels are higher than normal, but not high enough for a diagnosis of diabetes.