Guard against hypothermia this winter

Take action immediately: People with the condition may not realize they have it


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Hypothermia, or abnormally low body temperature, is a dangerous condition that can occur when a person is exposed to extremely cold temperatures. Stay safe this winter by learning who is most at risk, the signs and symptoms, and what to do if someone develops hypothermia.

Hypothermia is caused by prolonged exposures to very cold temperatures. When exposed to cold temperatures, your body begins to lose heat faster than it’s produced. Lengthy exposures will eventually use up your body’s stored energy, which leads to lower body temperature.

Body temperature that is too low affects the brain, making the victim unable to think clearly or move well. This makes hypothermia especially dangerous, because a person may not know that it’s happening and won’t be able to do anything about it.

While hypothermia is most likely at very cold temperatures, it can occur even at cool temperatures (above 40°F) if a person becomes chilled from rain, sweat, or submersion in cold water.

Who’s most at risk?Victims of hypothermia are often:

Older adults with inadequate food, clothing, or heating

Babies sleeping in cold bedrooms

People who remain outdoors for long periods — the homeless, hikers, hunters

People who drink alcohol or use illicit drugs

Recognizing hypothermiaThe warnings signs of hypothermia among adults include:

Shivering, exhaustion

Confusion, fumbling hands

Memory loss, slurred speech drowsiness

Infants:

Bright red, cold skin

Very low energy

If you notice any of these signs, take the person’s temperature. If it is below 95° F, the situation is an emergency — get medical attention immediately.

If medical care is not available, begin warming the person, as follows:

Get the victim into a warm room or shelter.

If the victim has on any wet clothing, remove it.

Warm the center of the body first—chest, neck, head, and groin—using an electric blanket, if available. You can also use skin-to-skin contact under loose, dry layers of blankets, clothing, towels, or sheets.

Warm beverages can help increase body temperature, but do not give alcoholic beverages. Do not try to give beverages to an unconscious person.

After body temperature has increased, keep the person dry and wrapped in a warm blanket, including the head and neck.

Get medical attention as soon as possible.

A person with severe hypothermia may be unconscious and may not seem to have a pulse or to be breathing. In this case, handle the victim gently, and get emergency assistance immediately.

Even if the victim appears dead, CPR should be provided. CPR should continue while the victim is being warmed, until the victim responds or medical aid becomes available. In some cases, hypothermia victims who appear to be dead can be successfully resuscitated.

Be preparedTaking a first aid and emergency resuscitation (CPR) course is a good way to prepare for cold-weather health problems. Knowing what to do is an important part of protecting your health and the health of others.

Taking preventive action is your best defense against having to deal with extreme cold-weather conditions. By preparing your home and car in advance for winter emergencies, and by observing safety precautions during times of extremely cold weather, you can reduce the risk of weather-related health problems.

Source: U.S. Centers for Disease Control



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