Library hosts water workshop

Wantage. The New Jersey Council for the Humanities in conjuction with Rowan University are collecting water stories from all 21 counties in New Jersey. On Jan. 11, they came to the Wantage Library to collect stories from Sussex County. Residents’ stories and comments will be recorded with the ultimate goal of the project being to connect people, places and water in New Jersey.

13 Jan 2020 | 01:47

Water, we tend to take it for granted.

A staple that’s always available but in reality is a life spring necessary for life itself.

On Saturday Jan. 11, a “What is Your Water Story” workshop took place at the Sussex-Wantage Library.

The workshop conducted by the New Jersey Council for the Humanities (NJCH) in conjunction with Rowan University consisted of the research team of Dr. Jennifer Kitson, Megan Bucknum and Mahbubu Meenar with Kitson as the facilitator of the Sussex County workshop held at the library.

Roughly six Sussex County residents participated by voluntarily giving their oral history of water. Water workshops will subsequently be held in all 21 counties. Residents’ stories and comments will be recorded with the ultimate goal of the project being to connect people, places and water in New Jersey. The main question of the water discussion asked participants to discuss a personal meaningful New Jersey water source.

Group moderator Kitson chose the beach at Spring Lake. Being a native Californian, she didn’t care for the busyness of Jersey shore towns but Spring Lake’s beauty and calmness struck a note for her.

Several discussion members cited the Wallkill River as a major water source in Sussex County, commenting on its beauty and the fact that the river flows north unlike other rivers.

“It’s fantastic living between the Delaware and the Hudson, both flowing south and the Wallkill choosing its own path flowing north,” said participant Barbara.

Barbara also spoke fondly about her artificial pond and real pond created out of Lounsberry Pond.

Participant Dave spoke of the clear, clean water at the artisan springs in Stokes State Park. “The springs are a special treasure.”

Participant Maureen discussed her son’s medical difficulties caused by bacteria and too much calcium in her water.

Participant Ken shared his 1973 move to Sussex County, septic perk tests and an initiation into country living with frozen solid water pipes.

At the conclusion of the one -hour workshop, Dr, Kitson reminded the group and thanked them for their verbal contributions to the study of water.

The research team has a NJ Water Stories Hotline where residents can leave a voicemail about their water stories. 856-345-9461